LATEST NEWS
SUBMIT
THE FESTIVAL
SPECIAL EVENTS
2017 FILMS
WINNERS
TICKETS
YOUNG FILMMAKERS
SPONSORS
PRESS


ABOUT US
FRIENDS OF THE FESTIVAL
TESTIMONIALS
SUCCESS STORIES
PHOTOS & VIDEOS
FILM ARCHIVES
CONTACT

SEARCH

PayPal - Donate!



FILM LIBRARY » 2015 » DOCUMENTARY » FILM DETAILSNEXT »
STOP
TRAILER

 
STOP
 
NY Premiere

Director: Spencer Wolff

United States, 2014, 88min
Format: Digital
Festival Year: 2015
Category: Documentary
NEXT 2015 DOCUMENTARY FILM »
NEXT 2015 FILM »

2015 FILMS »
2015 DOCUMENTARY FILMS »

Cast:  David Ourlicht, Adhyl Polanco, Jeffrey Fagan, Jumaane Williams
Crew:  Cinematography: Zev Starr-Tambor, Paul De Luna, Jeff Friedman - Editing: Spencer Wolff - Music: Bombino, Daniel Wohl, Adam Crystal, Josh Kessler, Ares Di Gisenyi - Sound: Felipe Diaz
Email:  spencer.wolffgmail.com
web:  www.stopthefilm.org

synopsis
The feature length documentary STOP follows three years in the life of David Ourlicht, one of the plaintiffs in Floyd v. City of New York, the class action lawsuit that challenged the New York Police Department's practice of Stop & Frisk. By interweaving the story of David's family with the action around the trial, STOP places the controversy surrounding Stop & Frisk in the context of a long history of civil rights and policing in New York City.

director
Spencer Wolff is a former Teaching Fellow in the Department of Film Studies at Yale University and a member of the New York Bar. He holds a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Yale University, a Masters in law from the Sorbonne, a J.D. from Columbia Law School, and a bachelorís degree from Harvard College. He also blogs on issues of race and policing for the Huffington Post (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/spencer-wolff/). He has written, directed and produced two short films (Stigma 2012, Paris Trip 2010), and has worked on several short and feature films.
Filmography   

filmmaker's note
Unlike the hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who have been stopped over the last decade, I came to the issue of policing in NYC via a newspaper article. In A Few Blocks, 4 Years, 52,000 Police Stops (2009), New York Times reporter Ray Rivera revealed that thousands upon thousands of fellow New Yorkers were being routinely stopped, interrogated, and often roughed up by the police. It seemed like a throwback to another era. Like stories I had heard from my family about the civil rights movement, or even the rough days of the 1990s, when Mayor Giulianiís police force aggressively swept through the city. But this was the shiny safe, new Bloomberg New York. I simply couldn't understand why the police were making nearly 700,000 stops a year. I called up Ray Rivera, and he put me in contact with the Center for Constitutional Rights. In 2008, they had initiated a lawsuit challenging what they considered the NYPDís disproportionate and indiscriminate stops. As I delved deeper into the police policy I discovered that these stops were happening all over the city, and they were increasing, not decreasing, as the city got safer. The people targeted by the police hated the stops. As a lawyer I was dubious about their legality. As a native New Yorker, I was skeptical about their place in a city as diverse as our own. But a cause is not a film. Then I met the Ourlichts. Their family history was a revelation. It brought together New York Cityís past and present, its many neighborhoods, its struggles with stop and civil rights, its contest over Floyd and its fear of criminality. The Ourlichts held up a mirror to our city and helped us look back at ourselves. Then I knew this wasn't merely a cause. It was a film that had to be made.

related links
Facebook
IMDb Vote or Review
Google Search
Printer friendly page
2015 FILM LINEUP »
NEXT 2015 DOCUMENTARY FILM »



   

ABOUT CONTACT NEWS
 

© 2011-2017
Queens World Film Festival, Inc.
Screening Challenging and Exciting Film From Around the World and Around the Corner.